@White=[C] DNR agent helps Wounded Warrior and son
by By Cheree Dye, Staff Reporter
Jan 06, 2014 | 598 views | 0 0 comments | 30 30 recommendations | email to a friend | print
@White=[C]

While on patrol near Pine Log, Department of Natural Resources Sgt. Mike Barr met Tom Anglin and his 12-year-old son, Thomas.

After speaking with them, Bar learned that Anglin served three years with an airborne unit of the Army and sustained a debilitating back injury. Trained as a rough terrain jumper in the 57th Engineer Company, Anglin said, “We are the only company in the Army trained to intentionally jump into the trees and create landing zones for helicopters to deliver supplies.”

A father of four children, he joined the military because he wanted to make a better life for his family. However, now the military has declared him to be 75 percent disabled. He works when he is able, doing various jobs — such as welding — that allow him to stay seated.

Prior to his military career, Anglin hunted often with his son but since his injury it was difficult for them to scout a location and make the necessary preparations for a successful hunt.

While Anglin was deployed to Iraq, Thomas harvested his first deer with his grandfather but he wanted to share the experience with his dad.

Barr challenged Thomas to complete the hunter safety course and agreed to find a hunting area for them upon his completion of the course.

In December, Anglin contacted Barr and said he was improving and Thomas had received his hunter safety certificate. Barr kept his promise to Thomas and contacted long-time friend Frankie Johnson, owner of Styles Collision Center in Cartersville.

In a written press release, Barr said, “Johnson is also a hunter and believes in giving back and encouraging the next generation of hunters. He gladly opened his private property to the Wounded Warrior and son to hunt.”

According to Barr’s written release, “On December 28, Johnson met Barr, Anglin and Thomas in northwest Bartow County and he selected a tower stand in a pine thicket overlooking a food plot. The weather was cold and a slow rain started about 9:30 a.m. Barr noticed that the deer seemed to be moving around during the early afternoon and encouraged the hunters to stay in their stand even though wet and cold. They had packed a lunch and decided to stay as long as possible.

“Around noon, three deer came through the thicket. Moving at a fast rate was an eight point buck, a doe, and a spike. Tom was able to stop the third deer by making the sound of a bleat of a young doe. Thomas made the shot with a .270 caliber rifle. The deer was just what the 12-year-old hunter was looking for.”

“We are very thankful to Mr. Barr and the property owner for helping us with this opportunity. There is a lot of work and preparation involved with hunting and it is difficult for me to do it now with the pain in my back. I am very proud of Thomas and glad that I got to experience this with him,” said Anglin.

For more information on hunter safety classes, go to www.gohuntgeorgia.com.