Cartersville High seniors back in the lounge
by Mark Andrews
Jan 23, 2012 | 3531 views | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Members of the Cartersville High School class of 1966 talk about their days on the campus, from left, Diane Caraway, Steve Stewart, Sue Smith and Phil Brandon.
SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
Members of the Cartersville High School class of 1966 talk about their days on the campus, from left, Diane Caraway, Steve Stewart, Sue Smith and Phil Brandon. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
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More than 70 Cartersville High School alumni spanning 15 years of graduating classes came together over the weekend for a reunion, and for many of the graduates, the Internet has put to bed the time-tested challenge of trying to imagine how a former classmate would look as an adult.

"We've been sharing old photographs of when we were young, of how Cartersville was like when we were young and stories about each other because we all grew up together," said alumni Lucius Harwell of the Cartersville High School Senior Lounge Facebook group, named after the spot where seniors with passing grades could spend free time.

Harwell said after about two-dozen friends met last year to celebrate the birthday of classmate Dianne Mines, he was struck with the idea to create the group, which also includes rooms for politics and religion. All groups are private and can only be accessed by members, with most members ranging from the class of 1960 to the class of 1975.

"Out of [the group] we've almost become one big happy family because we can go over to the political room and just disagree with each other all we want to or go to the religion room and talk about religion, but in the lounge we're all on a level field, we don't talk politics, I purposely left that out of there," Harwell said.

Harwell said the success of the group is due to God and that members pray for each other.

Mines said, "Whenever anyone has a need for themselves or a friend, they'll say [they need prayers] and we've already felt it change some lives."

Harwell echoed her statements.

"We have a great batting average too, so far we've been pretty good with it," Harwell said.

Mines and Harwell said they would like to see the group grow.

"I know a lot of people who have not come into the room or even Facebook, their parents still live in Cartersville and read [The Daily Tribune News] and we're hoping through that we can reach other people because we do have a lot of fun," Harwell said. "It's cathartic to get together with people from your childhood who are now your age and feel better about growing old, because you've known each other forever, even though you've disconnected for a while."

While topics range from children, pets, health, losses, retirement and reminiscing about high school days, Mines said any graduates who visit the group will enjoy the experience.

"It's an absolutely insane group of people who share funny stories, comments, and there are some people who are just so witty that they make everybody laugh," Mines said, leaving out any CHS alumni inside jokes or details on updates. "You have to get on there to see what's happening."