Etowah Indian Mounds featured as one of WSB-TV's 'Hidden Treasures'
by Marie Nesmith
Jun 28, 2011 | 2939 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Etowah Indian Mounds Interpretive Park Ranger Steve McCarty gives visitors a demonstration on weapons and tools used by Native Americans who inhabited the area. 
SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
Etowah Indian Mounds Interpretive Park Ranger Steve McCarty gives visitors a demonstration on weapons and tools used by Native Americans who inhabited the area. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
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On Wednesday evening, the Etowah Indian Mounds State Historic Site will be one of three attractions featured on "Georgia's Hidden Treasures." Starting at 8 p.m., WSB-TV's 30-minute special also will highlight Dukes Creek near Helen and Atlanta's Piedmont Park.

"I don't think many people realize that a large community of people thrived in the Cartersville area more than 1,000 years ago," said Kim Hatcher, public affairs coordinator for Georgia State Parks & Historic Sites. "I hope that WSB's 'Hidden Treasures' will help Georgians understand more about our history and encourage them to visit Etowah Indian Mounds. And being able to see it on television will help people realize that the historic site is much more than the mounds themselves. We have benches along the beautiful river, a recreated house, small garden, museum and gift shop."

Regarded as the most intact Mississippian Culture site in the Southeast, Etowah Indian Mounds at 813 Indian Mounds Road in Cartersville features six earthen mounds, a village area, a plaza, borrow pits and a defensive ditch.

From a replica wattle-and-daub house to a diorama illustrating what the village would have looked like in A.D. 1300, the 54-acre property offers various visual tools for visitors to gain insight into how thousands of American Indians lived from A.D. 1000 to A.D. 1550.

"A major network like WSB covering the Etowah Indian Mounds is great exposure, as you can imagine for our local attraction," said Regina Wheeler, deputy director for the Cartersville-Bartow County Convention & Visitors Bureau. "Of course the Indian Mounds is one of the state historic sites which has undergone some changes in budget cuts over the past few years, shortening their hours to only Wednesday through Saturday.

"And in doing so that limits the amount of time that people can visit. However, we think it has spurred new interest and perhaps brought a greater awareness of these attractions, a new appreciation for them if you will."

For more information about Etowah Indian Mounds, call 770-387-3747 or visit www.gastateparks.org/EtowahMounds.