Heavy Metal in Motion revs up Oct. 8
by Marie Nesmith
Sep 29, 2011 | 1731 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Drag racer Kelly Gray helps Lola West into the seat of her dragster at Tellus Science Museum’s Heavy Metal in Motion last year. In its second year, the event on Oct. 8 will include the Tornado Intercept Vehicle used by storm chasers. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News, File
Drag racer Kelly Gray helps Lola West into the seat of her dragster at Tellus Science Museum’s Heavy Metal in Motion last year. In its second year, the event on Oct. 8 will include the Tornado Intercept Vehicle used by storm chasers. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News, File
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Known for its celestial wonders and extensive collection of minerals and fossils, Tellus Science Museum will direct its focus to vintage vehicles and machines with its Heavy Metal in Motion event Oct. 8.

"We see it as an extension of our transportation gallery, Science in Motion," said Tellus Executive Director Jose Santamaria. "We have cars and trains and helicopters and those are kind the craft that we're going to have similar vehicles of [at Heavy Metal in Motion]. We're having a couple of helicopters, some antique tractors, vintage vehicles, a hovercraft.

"So it's a way to extend this very unique gallery outdoors and have the public experience it in a way they can't in the gallery. In many cases, they'll be able to climb into these vehicles or touch them and talk to the people that own them and operate them. I think it's just going to be a very unique and really fun event."

Ongoing from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., the event will display various vehicles and equipment, including a 1979 Bell Ranger helicopter, a tow truck, vintage fire engines, amphibious crafts and a speedy dragster.

"I think the big thing this year is the Tornado Intercept Vehicle used by the storm chasers," said Tellus Marketing Director Joe Schulman. "It's just a big sort of armored car they use when they're chasing down tornadoes in tornado alley in the Midwest.

"So that's going to be here and with that we are going to have a special movie playing in the theater," he said, referring to the 3-D movie "Tornado Alley."

In addition to the displayed vehicles and movie, the event also will consist of the new planetarium show, "Forces of Nature," and children's activities, such as train rides and creating engineer hats.

Encompassing 120,000 square feet at 100 Tellus Drive in Cartersville, Tellus is comprised of four main galleries -- The Weinman Mineral Gallery, The Fossil Gallery, Science In Motion and The Collins Family My Big Backyard -- a 120-seat digital planetarium and an observatory. Since it opened January 2009, the museum has attracted more than 500,000 visitors. Tellus is drawing about 200,000 people annually, a quarter of whom are students.

"We're in our third year now of operations," Schulman said. "We're finding out [the] big events that we're going to be known for here at Tellus. One of those is 'Night at the Museum.' [Others are] National Astronomy Day [and Rockfest] and another one is our Heavy Metal in Motion, and this will actually be the second year of it. The big thing about it is people had so much fun.

"We had such a big crowd for it and so much enthusiasm. We realized it's an event that people enjoy coming back to every year. It's a great event because kids love vehicles, unique vehicles, big vehicles -- things they don't see every day. They love being able to get up close to them. Some [of the vehicles] they will be able to get inside of them. And it makes them smile and that's what we're here for, for these kids and the adults too to have fun but to also learn something as well."

Heavy Metal in Motion will be included in regular admission to Tellus -- $12 for adults, $10 for individuals 65 and older, and $8 for children ages 3 to 17 and students with ID -- and it will be free for museum members and active military personnel with ID. For more information about the museum and its upcoming events and programs, call 770-606-5700 or visit www.tellusmuseum.org.