Local 4-H club and vet to offer discount rabies clinic
by Mark Andrews
Apr 13, 2011 | 4129 views | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Spencer Tally, DVM, plays with Tiger, one of his Pet Vet Clinic office cats that roam his offices. The April 30 rabies clinic will be open to all cats and dogs three months and older that are not pregnant.
SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
Spencer Tally, DVM, plays with Tiger, one of his Pet Vet Clinic office cats that roam his offices. The April 30 rabies clinic will be open to all cats and dogs three months and older that are not pregnant. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
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The Bartow County 4-H Club and Bartow County Environmental Health, in cooperation with Pet Vet Clinic, are offering a rabies clinic at a reduced cost to Bartow County residents on Saturday, April 30.

The clinic is a community service project and fundraiser for the Bartow County 4-H Club and Pet Vet Clinic's Animal Angel Tree program, which helps fund emergency animal operations for existing clients.

"[4-H] is providing a community service and at the same time is being able to raise money," said Spencer Tally, DVM, of Pet Vet Clinic.

There will be one clinic from 9 to 11 a.m. at Cartersville First Baptist Church, 241 Douthit Ferry Road, and another from 1 to 2 p.m. at United Community Bank in Adairsville.

Because there will be only 400 vaccinations available, the clinic will be on a first-come, first-served basis and each vaccination will cost $10, cash only. The clinic is open to all cats and dogs three months and older that are not pregnant.

Tally said the rabies vaccination is required by state law because it is one of the few illnesses contractible from household pets to humans. In Bartow, the vaccinations are required every year.

"Bartow County has had several cases of rabies and nationwide it's a concern because rabies is contagious to people and it's fatal once you get it," Tally said.

Northwest Georgia Public Health reported 31 cases of rabid animals positively tested in 2010, with 378 cases statewide. Although the state has seen a decrease in confirmed cases, last year was northwest Georgia's highest rate since 2003.

Allison Perkins, 4-H agent for the Bartow County Extension Office said the clinics will be run like a drive-thru.

Pet owners are urged to keep their animal on a leash inside their vehicle for safety reasons. All owners will be required to hold their animal for the veterinarian at each location.

"The money [raised] will go toward our funding since we are a nonprofit," Perkins said. "Our biggest expenses throughout the year are Project Achievement, so we use this money to offset the cost so when the kids go to compete at Rock Eagle or state congress and learn public speaking and organizational skills and presentation skills they don't have to pay."

According to the Georgia 4-H website, "4-H Project Achievement is a self-directed individual competition including presentations and, when age appropriate, a documented record of project work, leadership and service based on experiential learning activities."

Perkins said the clinic provides a community service, drawing assistance from 4-H members.

"For us it's just a $10 shot, and you can drive through and get your animal vaccinated," Perkins said, "so for people with multiple pets, not only does it help them because they get a discounted [cost] shot, but they also get to support the kids."