Business in Bartow: A chiropractic legacy changes hands
by Matt Shinall
Sep 05, 2011 | 2194 views | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Mark Patterson, D.C., left, and John Proctor, D.C., pose for a photo at Proctor Chiropractic where Proctor has retired and turned over the practice to Patterson. Proctor had practiced chiropractic care for more than 62 years. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
Mark Patterson, D.C., left, and John Proctor, D.C., pose for a photo at Proctor Chiropractic where Proctor has retired and turned over the practice to Patterson. Proctor had practiced chiropractic care for more than 62 years. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
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After 62 years of service in the chiropractic field, John Proctor, D.C., has turned over the reins of his Cartersville practice and officially retired -- again.

As the saying goes, "third time's a charm,"and Proctor seems to agree. Turning 90 in November, Proctor is in his third retirement, subsequently coming back to open a new practice after his first two attempts.

Taking over the clinic is Mark Patterson, D.C. At 51, Patterson's desire and determination led him to accomplish his dream of practicing in his own clinic. Patterson began studying chiropractic care in 1982. Soon after, he and his wife separated, and before long, Patterson gained full custody of his two sons.

Attention shifted to caring for his family and 18 years later, Patterson went back to school determined to reach his goal. After graduating in March looking to practice a specialized treatment method, Patterson interviewed with Proctor and found the perfect fit.

"I've been looking for a year to find someone that does the work that we do because we specialize at what we do, and there's only about 500 of us in the world that do what we do," Proctor said. "We adjust people and they don't even realize it, they don't feel it. People say, 'You didn't do anything.' But it works.

"What we do, we X-ray and find out by mathematical instruments how to set our instrument and correct the vertebral misalignments."

The technique utilizes a percussion device called an activator to deliver specific upper-cervical alignments with low force.

Patterson is excited to be a part of Proctor's legacy and begin his own practice. The signage at 1010 N. Tennessee St., Suite 116, still reads Proctor Chiropractic, but within a year Patterson plans to convert the name over to his own -- Patterson Family Chiropractic Clinic.

"[Proctor] has the greatest patients. Even before I took over, I told him how lucky he was to have such good patients. All of his patients have been very welcoming and receptive of me," Patterson said. "It's a big sense of gratitude to finally accomplish a goal that began in 1982. It was a big accomplishment, and I wish my father was still alive to see it."

Patterson looks to grow the current practice and share with others the benefits of chiropractic care. The biggest misconception, Patterson feels, is the notion that everyone treats with the same technique. With more than 300 chiropractic techniques being taught, he said virtually every chiropractor has their own methods of treatment.

"My goal is to treat every patient as an individual and to make their health a priority," Patterson said. "The benefits [of chiropractic care] are allowing the body to heal itself, to have a fuller life. It's just a more natural way of life."

Proctor Chiropractic is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to noon and 2 to 6 p.m.; Tuesdays, from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 to 6 p.m.; Thursdays from 9 a.m. to noon; and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. For more information, call 770-383-9605.