Euharlee treats termites
by Amanda Ryker
Mar 12, 2012 | 1543 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Lee Roy Shephard looks under one of the wooden structures maintained by the city of Euharlee. The city has been getting some buildings treated for termites.
SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
Lee Roy Shephard looks under one of the wooden structures maintained by the city of Euharlee. The city has been getting some buildings treated for termites. SKIP BUTLER/The Daily Tribune News
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Warmer weather and spring's approaching April showers and May flowers will bring about colorful blooms and an array of creepy-crawlies. With that in mind, the city of Euharlee wasted no time in treating their historic buildings for the pesky termites that were recently discovered.

"They say the best thing to do is when you see them, treat them," Euharlee's Public Works Director Lee Roy Shepherd said. "We have 11 buildings that have been treated."

The city has several buildings primarily built of wood with a wooden foundation, providing a desired haven for termites. Buildings with wooden pillars -- or wood directly in contact with the earth -- cannot receive a guarantee bond through any extermination company. However, buildings with a stone pillar could possibly receive some type of bond.

For those with stone pillars, such as Euharlee's old court house, Shepherd said an exterminator will treat the area by drilling a hole in the stone and releasing the liquid poison. While the base is not wooden, Larry Cline of Cartersville's C&C Extermination said that termites can still be found in a type of concrete base.

"They will come up between the brick and the block and you have to keep a close eye around your seals," Cline said. "They go through the expansion joints or concrete is going to crack. They have to have moisture. They live in the ground but they do come backward and forward and they travel in the mud tubes."

For residents as well as business owners, Cline said a notable sign of termites is an appearance of mud tunnels running along foundation walls. In basements, Cline suggests checking up the walls and around the slab. Carports and porches also are critical areas.

"If you've got a crawl space, you need to make sure it stays clean so there's no wood or paper on the ground," Cline says. "That's normally what we do -- an inspection and look for signs of termites."

Though warmer weather is typically when most insects appear, termites know no seasonal schedule.

"They work year-round but you have your swarmers in the swam season, which we're fixing to get into," Cline said. "A lot of times you will see your swarmers, but a lot of times you won't see the swarmers because when they swarm, if you just don't happen to be there, you may never see them. A lot of times you'll find the wings lying around because they swarmed, but that's if they swarm inside the house and you see a lot of wings laying there. If you're not real careful you won't even see them if you vacuum them up and never know they're there."

A regular inspection and treatment at the first sign of termites is the best option. For Euharlee, the inspections will continue beyond the current treatment and throughout the year to ensure the historic buildings remain intact and unharmed by nature's hungry pests.