Bagley receives Caregiver Award from Redmond
by Jason Lowrey
Oct 28, 2012 | 2624 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Darlene and Buddy Bagley stand in the Adairsville Middle School football field for the 2012 Pink Out event held Oct. 26. Bagley won the 2012 Caregiver Award from Cancer Navigators after being nominated by his wife. JANICE REED/Special
Darlene and Buddy Bagley stand in the Adairsville Middle School football field for the 2012 Pink Out event held Oct. 26. Bagley won the 2012 Caregiver Award from Cancer Navigators after being nominated by his wife. JANICE REED/Special
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Adairsville City Council member Buddy Bagley received the 2012 Caregiver Award Oct. 23 from Redmond Regional Medical Center as part of its Surviving to Share Contest. This was the first year for the caregiver award, which was presented in addition to the traditional survivor’s award.

Bagley was nominated for the award by his wife, Darlene, who has fought ovarian cancer, and a number of spreading tumors, for three years. To nominate her husband, Darlene Bagley wrote a letter to Redmond praising her husband’s support through her treatment.

“I could never say enough to express my love for my caregiver, my best friend, my angel…my husband,” Darlene Bagley wrote. “He is patient, kind, loving, cheerful, smiling and always happy. No matter how hard it gets, he can alway find something good about whatever the situation is.

“So many times when it seems like there would be no way things could work out, he always lets me know the Lord can make a way. He always has a way of giving me hope and never giving up.”

Bagley said he knew his wife had written the letter, but he was surprised to win the award.

“It’s a great honor. It is a great honor. I don’t deserve it,” he said. “I just … I don’t think it’s nothing special that I do [what I do]. I just do what I’m supposed to do as a husband — to take care of her.”

Bagley added it was his duty as a husband to take care of his wife as she battles her disease.

“I know some men that their wives have [gotten] breast cancer and as soon as they found it out, they got up and left. You don’t do that. That’s not what you do.”

In addition to supporting his wife through her treatments, Bagley has operated a number of charity events to raise money for area cancer support groups and charities such as Cancer Navigators. Every year he and his wife hold a motorcycle ride in Adairsville. This year they raised $12,608 and hope to hit $15,000 with next year’s July 13 ride.

That fundraising and his wife’s fight with cancer have made Bagley aware of how important volunteer work is in the fight against cancer.

“You hear other people and you say ‘them folks need help’ and then when you really get involved and see people hurting everyday and going to a cancer center once a month and see so many people devastated by that disease, it makes you want to help. It makes you want to do something,” he said.

Bagley believes that anyone who wakes up in the morning without cancer is “mighty fortunate” and he urged others to volunteer at Cancer Navigators and other groups to support survivors.

While he appreciated the kind words his wife had to say about him, Bagley believes she deserved more praise than himself.

“She’s a whole lot better than I am. Whatever she said about me she should have said about her twice. She is a wonderful, loving — one of the most kindhearted people that I have ever seen in my life,” he said.