Tellus lecture to highlight Amos' Odyssey in the Coosa River Basin
by Matt Shinall
Jan 03, 2013 | 1778 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Coosa River Basin Initiative Program Coordinator Amos Tuck, left, and Mary Freeman of the University of Georgia River Basin Center and U.S. Geological Survey identify fish on the Conasauga River. JOE COOK/CRBI, Special
Coosa River Basin Initiative Program Coordinator Amos Tuck, left, and Mary Freeman of the University of Georgia River Basin Center and U.S. Geological Survey identify fish on the Conasauga River. JOE COOK/CRBI, Special
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As summer came to an end, Amos Tuck, program coordinator for the Coosa River Basin Initiative, prepared to embark on a monthlong journey traveling 200 miles on three rivers. Next week, Tuck will present a lecture at Tellus Science Museum showcasing his adventure, sharing stories and explaining why the Coosa River Basin is considered North America’s most biologically diverse river system.

“Last year, Amos set out on a 22-day, 200-mile river odyssey from the headwaters of the Conasauga River in the north Georgia mountains down the Oostanallah and the Coosa Rivers all the way to Lake Weiss in Alabama,” said Tellus Director of Education Cantey Smith. “What he’s going to show with us is basically the inspiring sites that he experienced in this adventure.

“Even though we’re a physical science museum, we just felt this is a great tie-in to the science itself, the environment and other aspects we certainly are interested in.”

Tuck, a Cedartown native, graduated from the University of Georgia and the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources. Growing up in northwest Georgia, Tuck has had a passion for local rivers and streams since childhood.

“This experience is something close to his passion, but I think what we’re trying to gain is just a greater awareness. Not only for the biodiversity of this river basin, that’s basically in our backyard, and just to understand a little bit more about our water and the Coosa River Basin,” Smith said. “This is definitely a family event. He’s going to have a PowerPoint presentation with different photographs and stories from his adventure.”

Tuck began his paddle trip in late August and canoed from north Georgia to Alabama’s Weiss Lake, camping each night on the riverbank. For resupply purchases and to recharge electronic devices, which he used to chronicle his journey via a blog, Tuck would have his truck parked near the river once or twice a week throughout the trip. From his blog, www.coosa.wordpress.com, he wrote about the fish and wildlife he encountered as well as people he met and human impact seen along the way.

“My specialty is in fish and aquatic organisms and we live in a really special river basin because we have more endemic species than anywhere else in North America,” Tuck said. “The talk will mostly be about the diversity of the Upper Coosa River Basin that we live in and things that threaten that biodiversity in addition to stories from my trip and about going 200 miles in a month.

“When I give this presentation, I want people to realize how special of a river basin we live in and how we have things that live here that don’t live anywhere else in the world — and how there are things threatening that status as well.”

The presentation will take place at Tellus, 100 Tellus Drive in Cartersville, Friday, Jan. 11, at 7 p.m. The lecture is included in museum admission. For more information, call 770-606-5700 or visit www.tellusmuseum.org.

CRBI is a Rome-based nonprofit, which strives to protect and advocate for the rivers and streams of northwest Georgia converging at Weiss Lake to form the Coosa River. CRBI also provides educational opportunities throughout the year to raise awareness and promote recreation on the river. For more information, visit www.coosa.org or call 706-232-2724.