Members also approve one-year lift station agreement

White City Council votes to maintain insurance policy

By JAMES SWIFT
Posted 12/31/69

Members of the White City Council voted unanimously Monday evening to maintain the municipality’s 90/10 medical insurance policy via the Georgia Municipal Association (GMA.) With October …

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Members also approve one-year lift station agreement

White City Council votes to maintain insurance policy

Posted
Members of the White City Council voted unanimously Monday evening to maintain the municipality’s 90/10 medical insurance policy via the Georgia Municipal Association (GMA.) 

With October serving as open enrollment month, White City Clerk Robin Deal said the local government had the option of authorizing an 80/20 plan, which she said would’ve saved the municipality about $5,000.

“The top plan is the plan that the mayor and I picked and the plan in the middle is the current plan,” Deal said. “The total brunt of the costs of this is paid by the City, that the employees do not pay any part of this except for the two employees that are now going to be on a family plan.”

Deal said the City’s current 90/10 plan costs about $887 per employee. Maintaining that policy would increase the costs to $917,  she said, whereas the 80/20 plan would’ve dropped the rate to $846 per employee.

“It don’t matter how many policies you’ve got, when you go to the doctor and the hospital they’re still going to get you,” remarked White City Councilman Charles Buttrum. “For somebody on a fixed income, $71 really wouldn’t make a difference.”

Councilman Dennis Huskins said he was in favor of keeping the same coverage, even if it did cost the City more money. 

“We’ve got to find a way here so that anybody that wants the same coverage can get it and keep things like it is, we’ll pay the difference,” he said. 

Such costs are worth it, he said, if it means taking care of the local government’s long-term employees.

“We’re taking a hit,” he said. “You can take the money from the ball field, if you have to.”

Elsewhere on the docket, City of White Water Department representative Jimmy Nichols said the municipality used about 2.6 million gallons of water last month — with five major leaks reported throughout the community.

“We had three in the subdivision, one on Richards Road and one on Highway 411,” he said. “Our service lines are just in terrible shape, especially in the subdivision — they’re just wore out.”

Blake Davidson, the City’s interim chief of police, briefly took to the podium at Monday’s public meeting to address White’s staffing situation.

“Right now, we only have myself, I’m the only full-timer,” he said. “I’ve even reached out to other agencies to see if some of their full-time officers can come out and help us out part-time until we’re able to find a suitable applicant.”

Deal also told council members that a $464,000 Georgia Environmental Finance Authority (GEFA) loan application has been submitted for repairs along Richards Road, as well as a contract with CSX pertaining to the same project. 

She said the City anticipates bids to open on the project by mid-month. 

City of White Water Department representative Billy Baker discussed the status of the long-running project at a public meeting in September.

“When we get the resolutions from the railroad and the insurance, we’ve got to send in a check for $70,150, and we’ve already paid some stuff ahead,” he told council members last month. “That will get it all, basically, approved that we can turn the engineer loose, and I’m going to go on ahead and call him this week and tell him these resolutions are approved, go ahead and finalize the drawings — they’re basically done, except for just a few minor details on them.”

Council members — including Ryan Evans, who participated in the actions remotely by speaker phone — also voted across the board to approve a one-year maintenance agreement with Cleveland, Georgia’s Pro Pump Solutions, Inc. 

The $1,375 contract is for services related to the City’s lift stations near Toyo Tire and Aubrey Lake.

“They’re 15, 16 years old and never had anything done to them,” Nichols told the council. “If they have to do any repairs, that’s extra, this is just for checking them out.”